Tag Archives: Tristan Harris

Reflections from Wisdom 2.0

Be wise, be sillyOne of the most beautiful things about Wisdom and Mindfulness is what it brings out in people.  It has been a long time since I laughed so hard my belly hurt and smiled so much my cheeks ached.  This, all in the midst of profound learnings quiet inspiration and deep thought.  Did I get what I expected out of Wisdom 2.0? Why, yes indeed and more. Despite not being in (my usual) network and share mode, I met some amazing people with brilliant minds and fascinating stories.

To be clear, this was about research for me.  My intentions were, at least, that.  I’m in the depths of writing my doctoral dissertation on Wearable Technologies and Presence in the Workplace.  I was drawn to the speaker list (half of who’s books are included in my literature review).  I attended with my student hat on, intending to understand how wisdom and mindfulness are being adopted into organizations.  All my (book) research was pointing to corporate wellness programs.  What I was excited to see what that it, the Mindfulness Movement, was driven from a much more grass roots level.  Of course, for it to be accepted and supported (in other words given a budget) it had to show value for money.  The ROI through some form of metrics (performance, decreased absenteeism and presenteeism, engagement…).

The advocates and ambassadors of Mindfulness are breaking into the domain of leadership.  Listening to Jeff Weiner, LinkedIn CEO, we all secretly wished that we were working for such an enlightened and authentic leader.  As he lead the chorus “Sitting by the dock of the bay,…” we imagined ourselves part of his camp.  Ming Tan, Google’s Jolly Good Fellow and founder of Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute (SIYLI)gave us pause to the potential for extending these practices to other organizations with joy.  It is easy to get excited by the potential of conscious leadership and business practices when lead by such compassionate and wise leaders.  It is neither simply fluff nor driven by health related issues.  These guys mean business, with heart.

Some take-aways that I especially appreciated

  • Christine Carter (Happiness Expert) “Don’t lean in if it means leaning out from your sweet spot.”
  • Tristan Harris (Google, Product Manager) “Consumer demand can drive design change with the metric: time WELL spent.”
  • Adam Gazzaley (Neuroscientist) Innovation using video game mechanics can provide neurocrossfit for our plastic brains
  • Sherry Turkle (author) “The unedited life is most fulfilling”
  • Fred Kofman (author) “What is good for you doesn’t always taste good.”
  • Meng Tan (SIYLI) “Business at its best reduces suffering.”
  • Julia Hartz (Eventbrite Co-Founder) “say YES”

Next time I attend Wisdom 2.0, I will have finished my research and dissertation.  I hope to have something that will be worthy of sharing there.  But even more so, I look forward to taking the opportunity to be more present and enjoy the more extensive offerings in lectures, workshops and yoga that I missed this round.  Today I return to writing and research mode with a new

Note: Some of you may have seen me there and felt a twinge of frustration as my head was focused down on my iPad, rather than at the stage from which wisdom bestowed.  I was listening, far more deeply than you realize.  For me this my way of mindfully and creatively capturing the experience and learnings.  My Wisdom 2.0 sketchnotes album is below, and feel free to enjoy, share and download them if you like.

Link to flickr album for Sketchnotes from Wisdom 2.0

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